God, AIDS, Africa & HOPE

pensées of a Catholic priest

JuJu, you are wrong

“The time for reconciliation is over; now is the time for justice” , with those words commented Julius Malema, self-styled “commander-in-chief” of the EFF on the motion brought in by the very same party to allow expropriation land without compensation. Which would mean in consequence a change of the South African constitution to allow for it to happen.

The problem is not the question of redistribution of land which could obviously be achieved in great parts through the existing laws if and when the government systems would function without corruption and nepotism hindering progress on all levels of the administration. Obviously one can discuss how far in history one want to go to redress wrongs – whether the ethnic groups coming into the Southern tip of Africa long ago also took land and from whom – all valid and ethically important questions even including the repeated request of Mr Lakota in the national Parliament: “who are our people?” and from whom is the land taken and from whom not?

Where I see the wrong is in playing reconciliation against justice – because you simply can’t do it. Reconciliation needs justice and justice need reconciliation – the populist outcry of Julius Malema declaring reconciliation as ended is either a very calculated slogan to pour more oil in the emotional fire of land redistribution, or he has no sense for the realities of justice or reconciliation. Fact is, that such either/or is damaging the healing process of a troubled South Africa. It does not help to find a way to undo injustices without creating new wounds and new injustices which certainly will cause later generations to go through trouble nobody wants them to be burdened with.

Again: there is nothing wrong with redistribution of land, but a party which openly advocated land grabs Zimbabwean style is the least advocate for justice. There is a fine line between doing right in such a question – and yes, satisfying the masses makes it not easy to look at it with the reflection needed to give justice to the fact that all South Africans deserved land. The slogan “land without compensation” is like “white monopoly capital” and other slogans good for populist speeches, but bad for politics serving especially those in need and the poor. No action can take the pain away the older generations have endured in the past – and those are the once who should be part of finding a just solution – the loudest outcries I hear are from those too young to know the struggle first hand – and this cry sounds often shallow and more of entitlement then justice.

It is not easy to stand up against the mood of the so-called masses and emotions fired up on this question. One just be reminded how Mosiuoa Lekota was screamed down in Parliament. And it does not make it easier to do so while recognizing the depth of injustices committed during apartheid times. But a voice of reason never has a good time to speak out: Justice can only be done in the service of reconciliation – who says otherwise is not telling the truth to the people of South Africa.

Whatever we do in South Africa as South Africans – it must always be serving justice AND reconciliation – it is the only way to heal society.

Filed under: Africa, Politics and Society, Reflection, Society and living environment, South Africa, Uncategorized, , , , , , , ,

Two hearts are beating…

Indeed there are several sentiments to be felt while watching the events unfolding in South Africa.
A first is clearly the relief that President Zuma has past his due date and stepped down. It was more than time to go for him – and there is the hope that all his cronies and yeah-Sayers will follow in the next couple of days.
But honesty is owed the observation that the man now in power firstly did not become rich only through hard work but using the often unjust and abused system of BEE and secondly stood by and defended the indefensible – praising a corrupt president as an outstanding leader. Guilt by association is punishable in many countries and South Africa has suffered big times because of it. The poor, the marginalized, those without voice have been sidelined but used as voting stock by handing out food parcels,T-shirts and empty promises before election. Racism was fostered and used as a political tool and most of them jumping ship now and switching allegiance have fueled the fire of social dissent for years abusing their office. And lets not forget: statecapture would have continued if and when not brave journalists and parts of civil society went the extra mile to bring it into the open painstakingly.

It is a mammoth task lying ahead for this man, almost a sort of penance for Ramaphosa and his political allies to either succeed in changing course dramatically or failing the country completely. Odds are against them, as history shows little support for the hope that a liberation movement turns into a political party without destroying most what was fought for in years. But hope dies last and therefore for those with goodwill there can only be one way forward to support the efforts made by the hopefully completely changed cabinet to indeed start serving the people of South Africa again in a decent, honest and passionate manner. The dream of a rainbow nation as the beacon of hope for Africa and the world has is not completely dead but has survived alas on its last breath waiting to be resuscitated and brought to the beauty of times long gone. It will take a long time to cleanse the rot of the last 9 years and to convince even the small little rural civil servant that nepotism and corruption is a thing of the past – that cadre deployment has come to an end and entitlement has ceased to be at the forefront of developments.
Hard work, honesty, diligence and a sense of duty are the ingredients of the new beginning. Then the two hearts beating in the chest are coming together and making place to reconnect to the ones around so that this nation rise to the occasion with one big beating heart living what our beautiful constitution has promised for its people a long time ago.

 

Filed under: Politics and Society, Reflection, South Africa, , , , , , , ,

No place for the faint-hearted

It is indeed difficult to describe the mood of people in South Africa in the moment – and it gets even more complicated if and when one looks at the Western Cape. The drought in the latter slowly but surely creeps into the minds and hearts of those until now still ignorant of “Day Zero”, the day the City of Cape Town runs out of water. The consequences are harsh: the prospect of queuing for 25 L of water every day triggers now runs on the shops to secure enough drinking water – since days it seems almost impossible to get the 5 L still water containers – as soon as the truck arrives the water supposed to be stocked is sold out. But it’s not only water – the hunt for water-less hand sanitizer and plastic containers adds to the dooms scenario experienced by the woken up shopper in our days. Social media is full of sort of advice how to save water and stories are told around the dinner table how to cut down shower water use to under 2 liter while catching the grey water for flushing the toilet. Amazing times for Cape Town.
Spiced and interlinked because bulk water supply is normally belonging to the national sphere of government is the chaos triggered by state capture and it’s related parliamentary inquiries, not to forget the not so smooth farewell of our President Jakob Zuma, who simply refuses to resign to the dismay of many in his own party. While the opposition party of the DA is aggregating itself in Cape Town and the EFF keeps abusing those in despair for the own political gains of their “commander in chaos” the overall picture one could get overlooking South Africa in total is that of a soap opera playing out in such an unbelievable way that the viewer would say this can’t be real. But it is – South Africa at its best and the mood, one is in, swings from despair to amusement, from “I can’t believe it” to “it only can get better”. People are either surrendered to whatever comes next or they are on edge – it is difficult to remain in a space in between.

In all this social, emotional and political turmoil one keeps working and wondering what’s next hitting the fan and making life somehow “more interesting”. No place for the faint-hearted..

Filed under: Africa, Politics and Society, Reflection, Society and living environment, South Africa, Uncategorized, , , , , ,

13th HOPE Gala Dresden

HOPE Gala Dresden - the event to be in DresdenOctober 27th, 2018
36 days to go.

Ball of HOPE 2018

Join us @ The Westin in Cape TownMay 12th, 2018

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