God, AIDS, Africa & HOPE

pensées of a Catholic priest

JuJu, you are wrong

“The time for reconciliation is over; now is the time for justice” , with those words commented Julius Malema, self-styled “commander-in-chief” of the EFF on the motion brought in by the very same party to allow expropriation land without compensation. Which would mean in consequence a change of the South African constitution to allow for it to happen.

The problem is not the question of redistribution of land which could obviously be achieved in great parts through the existing laws if and when the government systems would function without corruption and nepotism hindering progress on all levels of the administration. Obviously one can discuss how far in history one want to go to redress wrongs – whether the ethnic groups coming into the Southern tip of Africa long ago also took land and from whom – all valid and ethically important questions even including the repeated request of Mr Lakota in the national Parliament: “who are our people?” and from whom is the land taken and from whom not?

Where I see the wrong is in playing reconciliation against justice – because you simply can’t do it. Reconciliation needs justice and justice need reconciliation – the populist outcry of Julius Malema declaring reconciliation as ended is either a very calculated slogan to pour more oil in the emotional fire of land redistribution, or he has no sense for the realities of justice or reconciliation. Fact is, that such either/or is damaging the healing process of a troubled South Africa. It does not help to find a way to undo injustices without creating new wounds and new injustices which certainly will cause later generations to go through trouble nobody wants them to be burdened with.

Again: there is nothing wrong with redistribution of land, but a party which openly advocated land grabs Zimbabwean style is the least advocate for justice. There is a fine line between doing right in such a question – and yes, satisfying the masses makes it not easy to look at it with the reflection needed to give justice to the fact that all South Africans deserved land. The slogan “land without compensation” is like “white monopoly capital” and other slogans good for populist speeches, but bad for politics serving especially those in need and the poor. No action can take the pain away the older generations have endured in the past – and those are the once who should be part of finding a just solution – the loudest outcries I hear are from those too young to know the struggle first hand – and this cry sounds often shallow and more of entitlement then justice.

It is not easy to stand up against the mood of the so-called masses and emotions fired up on this question. One just be reminded how Mosiuoa Lekota was screamed down in Parliament. And it does not make it easier to do so while recognizing the depth of injustices committed during apartheid times. But a voice of reason never has a good time to speak out: Justice can only be done in the service of reconciliation – who says otherwise is not telling the truth to the people of South Africa.

Whatever we do in South Africa as South Africans – it must always be serving justice AND reconciliation – it is the only way to heal society.

Filed under: Africa, Politics and Society, Reflection, Society and living environment, South Africa, Uncategorized, , , , , , , ,

Mandela Day & Tierra, techo y trabajo

Today it happens again like it happened the last years: everybody wants to be involved for 67 minutes – and especially those so-called VIP’s are keen to be seen with children, packing food parcels, donating blankets or whatever – just to make sure that everybody acknowledges their good heart and intention. And I don’t doubt these intentions at all, but I always ask myself what happens after the 67 minutes? What happens to those being fed, being cloth, being catered for the next morning, when they wake up in the same misery as the day before? What’s about the other 365 days and 22 hours and 53 minutes of the year? Waiting for the next Mandela Day – for the next invite to be part of the icon’s legacy? I don’t want to sound sarcastic but while doing also my 67 minutes and more in Blikkiesdorp yesterday morning to honor this legacy – I was looking into the faces of those we served and honestly, I partly felt bad knowing, that the rain jacket, the sweets and the porridge might be the highlight of their day but not changing their lives profoundly. Well, being lucky and knowing, that our organization HOPE Cape Town is working since years in this semi-permanent community I felt assurance that it was not a once off but part of a bigger effort to aid and help this very community of almost 15 000 people at the outskirts of Delft. But it remains that unsatisfactory feeling not being able to do more, to turn around those lives and giving them what Pope Francis described in three Spanish words as the fundamental rights of every human being: Tierra, techo y trabajo.  It was translated into English very loosely “land, roof and work” but I think this translation does not fit exactly the Spanish meaning. What the pope is saying and not only saying but demanding is that everybody has the right to have a piece of land he calls his own and yes, with a roof under which he can lay his head at night. But roof means more, it means a real home, a real protected place he feels secure and safe together with his loved once. And added is the right to have work, to be able to earn a living, a decent living and not a hand-out, not a social grant but the dignity, only own work can bring to a person. And it is about dignity, about the possibility to create and follow your own dream how to live you life, to be able to have a good education, a protected home, a loving family, an honest earned income to sustain this life. We in South Africa are far away from this dream of tierra,techo ytrabajo – not only in Blikkiesdorp but even in the posh suburbs of the cities a protected home seems to be an illusion just reading the headlines of a daily newsletter: robberies, intrusions and murder are making screaming headlines and the private security business is booming. And with more than 24% unemployment and the gross number of social grant recipients we are far away from “work for all” who should be able to do so. Maybe we should think of a Mandela moment next year where we don’t do hand outs but put our minds together and go for real change in distributing wealth and work, in giving more people the chance to get a better education, a real working environment, a chance to proof themselves and earn a decent living. Just a thought…

Mandela Day - a hand-out is simply not enough

Mandela Day – a hand-out is simply not enough

They need a real dignified future

They need a real dignified future

Filed under: Africa, Catholic Church, HOPE Cape Town Association, HOPE Cape Town Association & Trust, HOPE Cape Town Trust, Politics and Society, Reflection, Society and living environment, South Africa, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

13th HOPE Gala Dresden

HOPE Gala Dresden - the event to be in DresdenOctober 27th, 2018
4 months to go.

Ball of HOPE 2018

Join us @ The Westin in Cape TownMay 12th, 2018

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