God, AIDS, Africa & HOPE

pensée of a Catholic priest

Bridging continents

Fr Wim Lindeque, HOPE Goodwill Ambassador Katlego Maboe , Fr Stefan Hippler with Children of the Manenberg Afterschool Development Centre, a partner organization of HOPE Cape Town in Manenberg.

Preparing for my next trip starting in 2 days to Europe I also have to see to the talks I will give, the PowerPoint I will design to bolster the words spoken and to give color and pictures supporting the imagination of those listening and interested to know more about the work of HOPE Cape Town. The longer I am in this sort of business to connect different worlds I realize how difficult it has become to bring one world to another and to make sure, words are understood in the sense they are intended.

Yes, we speak the same language, we use the same words, but the framework of thinking, the weight of education and upbringing, the scenarios of real life experience seems sometimes so far away from the life presented in a talk or workshop.
How to bring the despair of a family living under the poverty line to somebody who has never experienced hunger?
How to bring the cold and the wet of a Cape Town winter day in Blikkiesdorp into the warm German homes?
How to explain the plight of not knowing what the day will bring in the Cape Flats and who will lie shot death in the crossfire of the gangs later that day in the dark morgue of Cape Town?
How to balance the hopelessness of so many South Africans against the possibilities and the beauty of a country rich on resources but suffering under a corruption so obvious that it hurts – with no European logic left to explain that people don’t rise up and stop allowing the abuse of those capturing the state entities.

Blikkiesdorp – semi-permanent housing close to the airport

Besides the difficulties to bring the world of Africa to Europe – or even the USA – there is also the way to fund-raise a complete different one. Perception how to assist and help is different in Europe compared with Africa – and once again completely different in the USA. So whatever you do, one has to reflect and think clearly who are the people one wants to address and how to creep in their minds and hearts and connect the dots so far away from each other.

Being a small organization in Africa, but connected with two other continents is a constant challenge – times of pure charity for those in far away Africa as I have known in in my childhood are gone – and I guess this is good like it is.
Solidarity, love of the neighbor and the stranger as requested by most religions need in our days strangely lots of translation work – the global village has quite some gaps to fill to make the connection a solid and understandable one.

But be it as it is – the challenge is on for me for the next 4 weeks to bring Blikkiesdorp, Tygerberg Children’s Hospital and it’s people, family and kids and also those of our partners in Manenberg and Delft to all those who are willing to listen, to learn and to connect – in different ways, with different possibilities – but at the end as a blessing for all being touched by the work of HOPE Cape Town.

 

Munich – Presentation to the Wirtschaftsbeirat of Bavaria

Filed under: Africa, HOPE Cape Town Association, HOPE Cape Town Association & Trust, HOPE Cape Town Trust, HOPE Cape Town USA, Networking, Reflection, Society and living environment, South Africa, , , , , , , , , , , ,

A memory…

Remembering the Ball of HOPE in Cape Town last May
– what a fantastic evening full of fun and laughter, but also reflection on the hard work, the organization HOPE Cape Town is doing as well as the dedication of the Southern African – German Chamber of Commerce & Industry to support trade and knowledge exchange between the respective countries.

If you have missed it – the next Ball of HOPE in Cape Town @ the Westin will be on the 12th of May 2018. Diarize it and make sure to be part of a great social event. But if you can’t wait and you want to support of HOPE Cape Town sooner – there are always lots of possibilities:

 

The HOPE Gala in Dresden on the 28th of October is happening soon and tickets are available via the HOPE Gala‘s web page.

You can donate towards the good cause securely via this web-page link: HOPE Cape Town South Africa (Donation is tax-deductible)

And did you know that we have also sister organisations:

in Germany HOPE Kapstadt Stiftung Germany and the USA HOPE Cape Town USA which all issue tax-deductible receipts.

Filed under: Africa, HIV and AIDS, HOPE Cape Town Association, HOPE Cape Town Association & Trust, HOPE Cape Town Association & Trust, HOPE Cape Town Trust, HOPE Cape Town USA, HOPE Gala Dresden, SA-German Chamber of Commerce & Industry, South Africa, Uncategorized, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Signs of hope – remission without long-term treatment

At the recent conference of the International Aids Society in Paris it was a topic hotly discussed by academics, researchers and representatives of NGO’s:

A 9-year-old South African child diagnosed with HIV when he was 1 month old has been in HIV remission for 8½ years — without regular treatment. This is the first reported case of a child controlling their HIV infection without drugs in Africa and the third known case globally. The related research was conducted among others by Prof Dr Mark Cotton, board member of our HOPE Cape Town Association.

Soon after diagnosis, the child was placed on antiretroviral treatment, or ART, for 40 weeks, at which point treatment was stopped and the child’s health was monitored. Blood tests in late 2015 revealed the child is in HIV remission, meaning levels of the virus in the blood are undetectable using standard tests. Subsequent testing of samples dating back to the child’s infancy confirm remission was achieved soon after treatment was stopped. Treatment was paused as part of a larger research trial investigating the potential for early ART to decrease infant mortality and cut the need for lifelong treatment among newborns infected with HIV. “This is really very rare,” said Dr. Avy Violari, head of pediatric clinical trials at the Perinatal HIV Research Unit at the University of Witwatersrand in South Africa. Violari is the child’s doctor and presented the findings at the 9th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Science in Paris

The child, not identified, was part of a study known as the Children with HIV Early Anti-retroviral Therapy, or CHER, trial, conducted in the years 2005 to 2011. More than 370 infants infected with HIV were randomly assigned to immediately receive ART for either 40 weeks or 96 weeks. A third group received no immediate treatment, but instead was looked after according to standard guidelines at the time. The CHER trial set out to investigate whether mortality rates could be reduced, but also whether earlier treatment could keep children healthy enough to enable them to come off treatment for certain periods. “We were hoping to make it a slower-progressing disease,” said Violari.

The study found mortality decreased by 76% and HIV disease progression reduced by 75% among the infants who received treatment immediately, for 40 or 96 weeks. The group receiving standard treatment saw an increase in mortality based on interim results, so that arm of the trial was stopped early. But virus levels in the 9-year-old case remained and remain undetectable. “The child is the only child showing remission,” said Violari. “We cannot see virus in the blood … we can see fragments of the virus in the cells,” she said, adding that these fragments appear not to be able to replicate, for now.

The South African child is the third reported case of long-term HIV remission in a child after early, limited treatment with antiretroviral drugs.

The first case was a Mississippi baby, a girl born in 2010, who received ART just 30 hours after birth until she was 18 months old, at which point HIV remission was achieved. The baby sustained remission for 27 months, until 2015, when she rebounded and the virus was found in her blood, crushing hopes that this approach could be the route to a “functional cure” for HIV. Next came the 2015 case of a French teenager, now 20, whose mother was HIV positive. The French child was given antiretroviral treatment soon after birth, stopped treatment at age 6 and has maintained undetectable levels of the virus in her blood since.

“We are delighted and excited by what happened with this child … we need to extrapolate from this to the benefit of other children on antiretroviral drugs,” said Prof Mark Cotton, Professor of Pediatrics at Stellenbosch University in South Africa, who co-led the study. “Africa is still the epicenter of the epidemic and more babies are acquiring HIV than anywhere else.”

Cotton hopes his team presenting these results will boost morale, both among cure researchers and those managing treatment programs for children across the continent.

More links:

Hope for future HIV cure revived
It is really very rare
Without drugs

Filed under: Africa, HIV and AIDS, HIV Treatment, HOPE Cape Town Association, HOPE Cape Town Association & Trust, Medical and Research, South Africa, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

HOPE Cape Town – a review in pictures

On Saturday the Ball of HOPE will take place – reminding us of the work HOPE Cape Town is doing and has done during the last 16 years. Here some pictures of the working and networking, HOPE Cape Town has been able to do in the last years:

Filed under: HOPE Cape Town Association, HOPE Cape Town Association & Trust, Reflection, Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Join us for the Ball of HOPE 2017

 

Ball of Hope BOOKING FORM 2017

Ball of HOPE 2017 invite and intro

Filed under: HOPE Cape Town Association, HOPE Cape Town Association & Trust, HOPE Cape Town Association & Trust, SA-German Chamber of Commerce & Industry, South Africa, Uncategorized, , , , , , , , , , ,

12th HOPE Gala Dresden

HOPE Gala Dresden - the event to be in DresdenOctober 28th, 2017
12 days to go.

Ball of HOPE 2018

Join us @ The Westin in Cape TownMay 12th, 2018
6 months to go.

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© Rev Fr Stefan Hippler and HIV, AIDS and HOPE.
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