God, AIDS, Africa & HOPE

pensées of a Catholic priest

A blessed New Year

A Happy New Year

A happy New Year we wish each other at the beginning of a new year – and I sometimes wonder whether I really want to have a happy one – “happy” sounds somehow superficial – and I am not sure if I always want to be a happy chappy day-in and day-out.

A Joyful New Year

I rather would go for a “joyful” wish – because joy seems to me much more deeper – joy is a basic condition seeing life through a special eye.

A Blessed New Year

But my sort of wish list tops with the phrase “a blessed year” – because it allows for all sorts of events and simply wishes that whatever comes up in the next 365 days may be taken as a meaningful building block for making me the person I should be. It acknowledges the up and down of a human life and experience and the wish to make sense of it all – sooner or later. Feeling blessed means also being a blessing for others – that should definitely be an aim for the year.
Because we need to be each others blessings and support in this crazy world, we need it for ourselves to survive the onslaught of madness which makes life exciting and draining at the same time.

A blessed New Year to all of you

Fr Stefan

Filed under: Reflection, Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Know your history

Travel time is not only time to connect with people, but the seemingly endless time in a plane is also an excellent time to read – to be able to undisturbed venture into interesting fields of curiosity as well as beefing up knowledge on the working environment. As I live in South Africa, it is indeed interesting to dig into the history of this magnificent country but also the so-called heroes of the struggle, so often quoted at political or social events, at demonstrations and public outbursts of frustrations and lack of service delivery.
Especially students love to quote their heroes like Steve Biko or Chris Hani; often they even see themselves as the qualified successors of those being killed during the struggle or directly thereafter in the chaos before the first democratic elections.
Reading about the two just mentioned I realize how much our youth in South Africa would be able to learn from them, if and when they would take the time out to study them – to really understand their struggle credentials and their thoughts about a South Africa, free of racism, corruption and nepotism – and free of the entitlement seemingly earned as a result of often a false historical narrative of the ruling party – leaving out the essence of real struggle – the internal struggle, the dreams and aspirations hard-worked for in times of hardship and discrimination.

How much easier would be to deal with questions of land reform, of free education, of racism and obviously with it on all other pressing issues –  if before using the buzzword decolonization and so-called radical economic transformation a part of shown energy would focus on learning from the struggle heroes how to seriously deal with the injustices of the past. But this would mean also to open up to the part of the struggle history which isn’t pretty but ugly and which does not fit into the narrative of some veterans.

The example of Zimbabwe and its struggle to rid itself from uncle Bob shows how difficult it is to maneuver through complicated matters if one does not honestly face the truth and reality of the presence and the past. The nepotism and corruption within the South African political elite shows what all can go wrong if one bends and distorts history and sell it to the next generation as the truth. It seems no society is willing to learn on the long run – it’s a pity because at the end it betrays the revolution and liberation people fought hard for and a lot ultimately died for. And it betrays those hoping for a better life now, promised again and again and often failing to appear in their lifetimes.

And one does not need to sit in an plane to have time to read – the libraries established all over the country give enough material and any quiet summer night will do to read and learn – for the better good of our society. And a knowledgeable society becomes automatically also a more healthy society – and that is what we all should strive for – healthy physically and mentally which is inter-connected as we all know.

Filed under: Africa, Politics and Society, Reflection, Society and living environment, South Africa, Uncategorized, , , , , , , , ,

Emotions

“Emotion is any conscious experience characterized by intense mental activity and a high degree of pleasure or displeasure. Scientific discourse has drifted to other meanings and there is no consensus on a definition. Emotion is often intertwined with mood, temperament, personality, disposition, and motivation” – so Wikipedia.

Creating emotions and connecting emotionally is a well know concept when it comes to fundraising, but seldom it is spoken about in a broader context and reflected in the worlds of non-profit organisations. Especially when it comes to not so pleasant forms of emotions like let’s say jealousy this is the case. Hidden behind formal questions and considerations the poison of jealousy is a formidable enemy of cooperation between non-governmental organisation – jealousy regarding fundraising results or publicity is hardly spoken about but whispered behind the backs of those involved. Jealously can destroy great work done and prevent developments needed to be up to the standard needed serving the purpose of an organisation.
Another emotion not often spoken about in our circles is the tension between humbleness and ego-trips and the mixture of those two – standing in the lime-light and being thanked at every occasion can be like a drug taken and not being missed any more.

Being in Dresden to be part of the HOPE Gala for the 12th time I am so much aware that as the chair of an organisation like HOPE Cape Town I depend solely on the goodness of other people to be able to fulfil my role in this NGO. It humbles me – again an emotion – to see how many people dedicate time and money, prayer and good thoughts to allow me to represent and lead this organisation. Without the volunteer to drive a so-called VIP, – without the cleaners making sure that the venue is clean for the show, without the chefs preparing meals for the after show party – without those working hard behind the scene to make it happen – without all those running around – HOPE Cape Town would not be what it is. Gratefulness is the feeling here to mention, a deep gratitude to all involved.

Humans are complex and so is their emotional household. We should be always aware of what it is what carries me as a person – we should always honestly assess our feelings and see what makes us tick. Honest reflection is the key.

Only when we reflect with honesty we acknowledge us and others in all the complexity we live as human beings trying to serve human mankind and making this world a better place for all.

Filed under: Reflection, Society and living environment, Uncategorized, , , , ,

Every day is a Mandela Day for HOPE Cape Town

Every day is a Mandela Day for HOPE Cape Town, but this day where we commemorate in practical terms Madiba is indeed a special day. We do good and mourn at the same time that corruption and mismanagement has stopped many developments in South Africa, which would have brought even more positive developments into the lives of those living at the margin of our society. It was great to see a real picture of Rainbow Nation activities during this day – have a look at the pictures – and go to our webpage www.hopecapetown.com or our FB page https://www.facebook.com/HopeCapeTownAssociationTrust/ to learn more about the great work of the organization, but also learn about the marvelous people who helped to make this day a very special one.

But Blikkiesdorp is also a tough environment – you don’t watch out and things are mysteriously disappearing – and it remains unknown whether it is driven by pure poverty and need or a lack of understanding between the words “mine” and “yours”. But being reminded that 5 star hotels telling you that nowhere more is stolen than in upmarket hotels by wealthy people I guess on Mandela Day one shouldn’t worry too much if more is distributed than planned. South Africa is in a very difficult situation right now and politicians and political leaders as well as business people are not really always example of honesty and decency. So I have decided just to overlook it for today and take pride and joy in what HOPE Cape Town has done today under the leadership of Marlene Whitehead and with the help of so many great people – thanks for making a difference and putting a smile on the faces of so many people. And the promise is as said in the beginning that we from HOPE Cape Town will continue to make every day a Mandela Day for the time to come.

Filed under: HOPE Cape Town Association, HOPE Cape Town Association & Trust, HOPE Cape Town Association & Trust, HOPE Cape Town Trust, Reflection, Society and living environment, South Africa, Uncategorized, , , ,

HOPE Cape Town – a review in pictures

On Saturday the Ball of HOPE will take place – reminding us of the work HOPE Cape Town is doing and has done during the last 16 years. Here some pictures of the working and networking, HOPE Cape Town has been able to do in the last years:

Filed under: HOPE Cape Town Association, HOPE Cape Town Association & Trust, Reflection, Uncategorized, , , , , ,

13th HOPE Gala Dresden

HOPE Gala Dresden - the event to be in DresdenOctober 27th, 2018
5 months to go.

Ball of HOPE 2018

Join us @ The Westin in Cape TownMay 12th, 2018

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© Rev Fr Stefan Hippler and HIV, AIDS and HOPE.
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